Bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies. Essay about Bartolome de las Casas's Destruction of the Indies 2019-02-18

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Bartolome de Las Casas

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

The Junta was remarkably inconclusive. The blindness of the chief Governors of the Indies not permitting them to discern, that no man can be called a Rebel who is not before a Subject. Instead, Christianity became the issue of new conflicts and factions. Las Casas quickly evangelized the serfs on his land, and, in either 1512 or 1513, he became a. Designed to clarify the conditions under which the Spanish could make war on, and enslave, native peoples, it finds its justification in the Christian imperative of Inter caetera. And thus wasdepopulated that island which had been densely populated. Exactly what prompted Las Casas to publish his own book the following year is uncertain.

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Bartolome de las Casas: A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies (1542)

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

John, carrying with them above two millions of men to the said Islands, which they afterwards destroyed through hard labor and continual bad usage; those that before liv'd in this Island, being not reckoned into their number, who were an infinite and unspeakable number, and it is a most sad thing to consider, and that which would move the most cruel hearts, to see all this fertile shore lie desert and depopulated. He could boast of powerful allies, especially in Spain: in 1544, despite opposition from colonists, he was named Bishop of Chiapas in southern Mexico. However, the relationship followed a downward pattern. He joined the order in 1523. These demands are troubling enough to modern sensibilities; but the way Spanish soldiers carried out the Requerimiento dismayed many even in the sixteenth century. As described by the author, it is sheer domination of the Indians by the Spanish, and the innocence of the Indians from doing anything back. Ironically, the man who spent his life vindicating the humanity of Native Americans has become, for history, the figure who vindicates the humanity of Spaniards.


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Bartolome de las Casas’s Destruction of the Indies Essay Example for Free

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

For the first time, the Spanish court recognized that Native Americans had rights, and attempted to protect those rights. And I say this from my own knowledge of the acts Iwitnessed. Wherefore to avoid prolixity, I shall say no more concerning these things, leaving them to be revealed at the day of judgment, when God shall pour his vengeance down upon these robbers and destroyers of mankind. They lie upon mats, only those who have larger fortunes, lye upon a kind of net which is tied at the four corners, and so fasten'd to the roof, which the Indians in their natural language call Hamecks. And many others coming out of the same Regions, having a desire to make a further Progress, they found many pleasant Countries, about some 300. Now it happened one day, that the Governor of the Island with sixty Horse, and three hundred Foot though the Horsemen were sufficient not only to waste the Island, but also the whole Continent called to him about three hundred of the Peers and Lords of the Nation, the greatest part whereof who were the more powerful, having by craft got them together in a straw Cottage, he cause to the burnt alive together with the house, the rest with an infinite fight of people he caused to be put to death by the Soldiers, who murdered the poor people like dogs with their Swords and Lances.

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Bartoleme de Las Casas, Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

In A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, Casas provides a scathing commentary on the cruelty exercised by the Spanish colonizers on the natives of Hispaniola—as well as explain the aims that motivated this behavior. Not differentiating among Europeans, the natives assumed the missionaries were in league with the soldiers, and, fearing massacre, the missionaries fled. Living thousands of miles from the Spanish court, many undoubtedly continued to do what they pleased. For each Christian ate as much food in one day as thirty Indians in one month. The perils of empire When Columbus returned from his first voyage to the New World, he did more than simply reshape the European conception of the world.

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Destruction of the Indies by Bartolomé de Las Casas

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

The plan ended in disaster, but Las Casas did not give up. The Spaniards massacred millions of natives as a result, raping women and killing innocent children and infants along the way. For from the South to the North it is stretched forward fourscore miles in length; in breadth it takes up sometimes eight, sometimes five, and sometimes ten miles, on all sides it is shut up with very high mountains; it is watered by thirty thousand Rivers and Rivolets, whereof twelve are not less then either Duerus, Ebrus, or Guadalquiver: and all the Rivers which run from the Mountains on the West side, whose number is twenty thousand, do all of them abound with gold. Bartolomé de las Casas, The Devastation of the Indies 1565 And of all the infinite universe of humanity, these people are the most guileless, the most devoid of wickedness and duplicity, the most obedient and faithful to their native masters and to the Spanish Christians whom they serve. And it was a common thing for them to say one to another; Give me a quarter of your Indian for my dogs, and too morrow when I bill one I will pay it you again; As if they were no more to be accounted of then the offal of a hog or sheep. Others were wont to go a hunting in the morning, and being ask'd how they had sped: Oh very well reply'd the other, my dogs have kill'd fifteen or sixteen Indians this morning; These have been all proved in the impeachments made by one Tyrant against another. It is a simple statement of an almost impossible feat for the time.

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Las Casas, of the

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

The lord says he would rather go down to hell than be with such cruel people as the Christians up in heaven. According to Aristotle, says Las Casas, the number of humans who fall in the category of natural slaves is very small; Native Americans are too numerous and prosperous to fit this category. Two they burnt while I was present, one being the Lord of Andonia, the other of Tumbala; neither could I by any persuasions prevail with them to take them out of the fire; and this I speak in the presence of God, and according to my own conscience, that I never knew of any commotion or rebellion raised by the Indians of Peru against them, though it was apparent to all how they did torment and massacre them. They sent therefore to the supreme Lord of the City, as also to all the other Lords and Governors, that they should give them a meeting, but they were no sooner come to parley, but they were all immediately laid hold on, leaving none to carry back these bad tidings to the rest; first they demanded of them six thousand Indians, to carry the Luggage which they had with them, which when they were brought together they shut up in their houses. Unsurprisingly, they were extremely unpopular in the and were met with much resistance. Thus, the European interest in the Short Account had less to do with concern for Native Americans than with a desire to blacken Spain at any cost. Here he follows a pattern common to many chroniclers and propagandists of the time: he exaggerates details to create the image of a utopia in the New World.

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Destruction of the Indies by Bartolomé de Las Casas

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

Then quoth he, He tell ye the cause of their coming. Encomiendas were granted to those who served the King, and encomenderos were expected to care for their natives and educate them in Christianity. But the basic argument was simple. By the same token, he must not have been surprised when the inevitable happened. De Las Casas goes through only a handful of the different accounts of genocide, but sufficient to prove his point. In the like manner they laid waste the Provinces of Tatepeca, Ipilcingonium, and Columa, every one of which is of as large a compass as the Kingdoms of Legiona and Castile.


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Destruction of the Indies by Bartolomé de Las Casas

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

. Las Casas lived from 1484 to July 17th, 1556. The account acts as not only an observation on the practices of the colonizers, but is also a reflection of the imperial policies of the Spanish Empire. Soon, the Franciscans, Augustinians, Jesuits, and Dominicans began to send groups across the ocean to begin evangelical activities. Consider here the equity of this war, the Captivity of this Prince, the sentence of his condemnation, and the execution of that sentence, the conscience of the Spaniards, which nothing deterr'd them from consuming and taking away by violence the great Treasures of this great King and of his Nobles, how they all concur to aggravate their devilish iniquity.


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Bartolomé de Las Casas: of the Indies: A Brief

bartolome de las casas the devastation of the indies

They are also poor people, for they not only possesslittle but have no desire to possess worldly goods. Impact In retrospect, however, Las Casas was hardly a failure. Moral backlash In 1511 an almost unknown Dominican friar named Antonio de Montesinos preached a sermon in the colonial capital of Santo Domingo in present-day. And because it was a fruitful Country, there went thither at several times several Captains, succeeding one another in cruelty, so that every one striv'd to outvie his predecessor in the inventions of exquisite torments to afflict the poor people. Peoples were annihilated and killed outright, the lands were devastated and wealth of nations was plundered. He may have felt the time was ripe for swaying public opinion, that given the debate, he would be striking at a moment when the Court was favorably disposed to his view.

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