John agard background. About John Agard 2019-02-08

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Analysis of Half

john agard background

This is satire — although the poem starts by apologising for being half-caste, Agard means exactly the opposite. Agard compares the English weather to being half-caste, saying the mix of sun and clouds in the sky is always present in England. Realising that most people who say this do so without thinking about what it really means, he tells off people who use this term without thinking. His father settled in and Agard moved to Britain with his partner in 1977, settling in ,. Agard was Poet-in-Residence at the National Maritime Museum in 2008.


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John Agard

john agard background

Today, she is a Jamaican National Hero, for her role in founding the Nanny Town community. But it may also be that sees the funny side to it himself. They very strongly capture the image of a determined, intelligent, influential woman and ask why no one learns about her. The next section of the poem argues that mixing colours in art, weather and symphonies does not make a half-thing. In this way, he challenges the readers to change their thinking, and come up with a better word.

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Half Caste (poem)

john agard background

Checking Out Me History Lines 50-53 The final lines of the poem reflects the first verse in nature, adding on two very important lines, wherein the narrator declares that they are unwilling to accept one side of the story of history, and are searching for themselves the truth behind what they are told in a classroom. Perhaps this is because fewer people use the term half-caste nowadays. You could say the same for blood and cultures. Agard writes: In the final six lines of the poem, Agard says he is only half a human being who casts only half a shadow, but the other person in the poem can come back tomorrow with his whole self—his eyes, ears, and minds. His tone is challenging, even threatening e. It is evident in the stanzas following the first that he is really not apologizing at all.

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Analysis

john agard background

Nanny the Maroon Lines 22-31 These lines repeat the themes from the last few, but in a much more pronounced way. He lives in Lewes, East Sussex, with his partner, the Guyanese poet. Historical Significance of Half-Caste This poem was included in called Half-Caste. He was also a sub-editor and feature writer for the , publishing two books while he was still in Guyana. Seacole performed a similar task, setting up a British-style hotel area near the battlefields so soldiers could recover their health in a comfortable and familiar environment.


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John Agard

john agard background

Agard was born in what is now Guyana in 1949; he is of Afro-Guyanese descent, and his mixed race upbringing is probably his inspiration for writing this poem. He objects to being called half a human being, and asserts that there is much more to him than we realise. John Agard was born in Guyana in 1949, with a Caribbean father and a Portuguese mother he is of mixed race. She escaped from slavery with several close friends and fled to Blue Mountain, where she scouted out strategic locations to build communities for escaped slaves. He is using patois, a version of which is spoken by many London teenagers.

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Analysis

john agard background

Lines 10-21 The next set of lines reveals that the narrator knows exactly who Toussaint is, and also that he looks up to and respects the historic figure a great deal. The reference to The Cow Who Jumped Over The Moon is especially noteworthy, being such a trivial and unimportant story that it pales in comparison to the vast majority of history from anywhere. Agard uses direct speech e. He loved to listen to cricket commentary on the radio and began making up his own, which led to a love of language. The speaker is so quick to offer his argument that he has no time for any real pauses. Nanny the Maroon was a Jamaican slave born to the Asante people in the late seventeenth century. It is difficult to separate this stanza by lines since it is several ideas strung together.

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About John Agard

john agard background

Finally, a peace was agreed upon, and the community survived and thrived. His anger really shows in this example, using the word spiteful when discussing how the clouds sometimes seem to not want the sun to be visible. Lord Horatio Nelson, an officer of the British Navy famous for losing an arm and an eye before losing his life after continually fighting and achieving victory after victory during the Napoleonic Wars, is something the speaker learns about. Stanzas 2-3 The second and third stanzas are filled with metaphors: Agard compares being half-caste to black and white piano keys making a symphony and Picasso mixing reds and greens to create his masterpieces. He went on to study English, French and Latin at A-level, writing his first poetry when he was in sixth-form, and left school in 1967.

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Half Caste (poem)

john agard background

He moved to England in the late 1970s and became a lecturer of Caribbean culture. Summary of Half-Caste Half-caste is a derogatory term for a person who is of mixed race. Half-Caste Analysis Half-Caste, which can be read in full , is composed of four stanzas of varying length, although there does seem to be some symmetry with these stanzas, as the first and last stanza contain only three lines, and the second and third stanzas are both fairly long. . And the speaker in the poem notes that they never learned about such figures, but were only taught of the glory of England instead. Again, these slashes add to the confrontational, angry tone of the poem.


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Analysis of Half

john agard background

These descriptions are designed to make freedom the most natural thing in the world. Nanny chose the location well, however, and the town proved impossible to capture, despite overwhelming numbers odds in favour of the British. The poem is filled with intentionally misspelled words which, when pronounced as they are spelled, force the reader to almost take on the accent of the true speaker. He loved to listen to cricket commentary on the radio and began making up his own, which led to a love of language. His awards included the 1997 , the Cholmondeley Award in 2004 and the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in 2012. Agard also employs sarcasm in his first stanza, seemingly apologizing for being of mixed race. Agard was Poet-in-Residence at the in 2008.

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