Romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5. Romeo and Juliet Act 5 Summary and Analysis 2019-01-20

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Romeo and Juliet Act 2

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

Your excuse for not telling me is longer than the simple yes or no which is all I want. He asks the Friar to marry them. Nurse I speak no treason. Is this how you reward me for all my trouble? The excuse that thou dost make in this delay Is longer than the tale thou dost excuse. It begins with Romeo alone in Mantua delivering a soliloquy about a dream he had the previous night. In her soliloquy, Juliet wishes that Romeo could transcend his name. At the end of the scene, Juliet departs to meet Romeo at Friar Laurence's cell.


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ROMEO AND JULIET, Act 2, Scene 5

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

My back o' t' other side,--O, my back, my back! Nurse And from my soul too; Or else beshrew them both. But I knew all of that about Romeo before. Have you deliver'd to her our decree? I will omit no opportunity That may convey my greetings, love, to thee. The sexual nature of their relationship stands in stark contrast to Juliet's arranged marriage to Paris, which is based on politics and greed, not love. Young Romeo Montague goes out with his friends to make trouble at a party the Capulets are hosting, but while there he spies the Capulet's daughter Juliet, and falls hopelessly in love with her. But all this did I know before. Nurse Have you got leave to go to shrift to-day? Alack, alack, that heaven should practise stratagems Upon so soft a subject as myself! Had she affections and warm youthful blood, She would be as swift in motion as a ball; My words would bandy her to my sweet love, And his to me.

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Romeo and Juliet Act 5 Summary and Analysis

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

Beshrew your heart for sending me about To catch my death with jaunting up and down. He said that along the way he got caught in a town, which had a contagious disease infecting many people. In one little body Thou counterfeit'st a bark, a sea, a wind; For still thy eyes, which I may call the sea, Do ebb and flow with tears; the bark thy body is, Sailing in this salt flood; the winds, thy sighs; Who, raging with thy tears, and they with them, Without a sudden calm, will overset Thy tempest-tossed body. Is this the thanks I get for my aching bones? What a head have I! I do the drudge work for your pleasure. Friar Laurence is upset by this news. I must be gone and live, or stay and die.


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No Fear Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet: Act 5 Scene 2

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

It beats as it would fall in twenty pieces. Juliet flew downstairs and into the garden, meeting the Nurse as a servant was opening the gate for her. Thus, even at the very end of the play, the audience could interpret Juliet's final statement as her intention to commit suicide or her desire to engage with Romeo sexually. Others, including the Norton Shakespeare, which this note is based on, continue the scene as follows. Go in: and tell my lady I am gone, Having displeased my father, to Laurence' cell, To make confession and to be absolved. Romeo and Balthasar arrive, and Paris tries to restrain Romeo, who is focused on breaking into the tomb.

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Read Romeo & Juliet in Modern English: Act 2, Scene 5

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

Nay, come, I pray thee, speak. Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn, Or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue Which she hath praised him with above compare So many thousand times? Act Two, Scene Three Out in the street the next day, Benvolio tells Mercutio that Romeo has not yet returned home. She was clumsy, slow, heavy and dull, like lead. She gets distracted, wondering where Lady Capulet is. The reading of the old copies is fain or faine; feign is Johnson's conjecture.

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Act 5, Scene 2

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

Oh God, here she comes! It is the lark that sings so out of tune, Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps. Scene 5, the next to last in the act, takes place shortly after noon. Though the Friar is surprised that Romeo has forgotten Rosaline so quickly, he is nonetheless delighted, because Romeo and Juliet's union presents an opportunity to quell the raging feud between the Montagues and Capulets. What did he say about our marriage? However, one analysis of Friar Laurence suggests the issue is a bit more complicated. Nurse Then hie you hence to Friar Laurence' cell; There stays a husband to make you a wife: Now comes the wanton blood up in your cheeks, 70 They'll be in scarlet straight at any news. Friar Laurence Now I have to get to the mausoleum alone.

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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, scene 5 Summary & Analysis

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

The audience comes away from the play hoping that these families have learned from the tragic events. It's a relatively short scene, serving to establish one plot point: Romeo and Juliet can get married. Do you not see that I am out of breath? There stays a husband to make you a wife. My words would bounce her to my sweet love, and his words would bounce her back to me. Beshrew your heart for sending me about, To catch my death with jaunting up and down! Wife, we scarce thought us blest That God had lent us but this only child; But now I see this one is one too much, And that we have a curse in having her: Out on her, hilding! Enter Nurse, to the chamber Nurse Madam! Nurse May not one speak? In this act, Shakespeare also introduces Friar Laurence a multifaceted character who understands the need for personal autonomy.

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Romeo and Juliet Act 2, scene 5 Summary & Analysis

romeo and juliet act 2 scene 5

Let me be satisfied, is't good or bad? Finally, before he leaves Mantua, Romeo buys some poison from a poor. Ah, now that lively blush comes into your cheeks. Finally, Shakespeare continues to explore the contrasts that he introduced in Act I, particularly the disparity between night and day or darkness and light. Analysis Act 2 is more focused than Act 1, in that it mostly serves to establish the marriage which will become the root of the play's dramatic conflict. However, within the the streamlined plot, Shakespeare explores the complications of love.

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