Tkam chapter 23. SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Chapters 23 2019-03-07

Tkam chapter 23 Rating: 4,8/10 1478 reviews

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 23 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

tkam chapter 23

Maudie's and find that she doesn't want to go see the case. He gets along well with the black community-even better than he gets along with the white community-but his actions are passive. Atticus tells Jem that once a person earns the respect of a Cunningham, the whole clan becomes fiercely loyal to that person. It was caught in a cotton machine when he was young and nearly bled to death. Scout's innocence when addressing Mr.

Next

SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Chapters 23

tkam chapter 23

Reynolds leaves and everybody in the house but Jem and Aunt Alexandria go the the porch. The commentary he is making is that the people in the town do not see black people as equals. It is revealed in this chapter that Tom Robinson is crippled in his left hand. Scout insists she was not bothered by Aunty's comments about herself, but about Walter. What is revealed about Tom Robinson in this chapter? Naw, Jem, I think there's just one kind of folks. The circumstatntial evidence is that he was at the Ewell's house and that he is black. She sees the difference between Walter and the Ewell family, and Walter is not trash.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 20

tkam chapter 23

Atticus reminds him that Alabama holds rape as a capital offense, but Jem argues the jury could have given a different sentence. People think that only a drunk white man would ever marry a black woman. Miss Maudie tries to point out to him that things are as bad as they seem. Dill: Dill becomes more aware of the world around him. They discuss the class system—why their aunt despises the Cunninghams, why the Cunninghams look down on the Ewells, who hate black people, and other such matters. Atticus notes that race tips the balance in a court of law, which is a place where everyone should be equal.

Next

To Kill A Mockingbird

tkam chapter 23

He tells Jem and Scout there was one jurist in particular who wanted to acquit, and that he took time for the others to persuade. She says the Finches are too good for the Cunninghams. Morals: - Atticus plays on the morals of the jury it fails - Jem and Dill portray their social values by crying at the injustice taking place. Mayella then asked him to grab a box from the dresser in the living room. Raymond's action here might also might be considered something of a cop-out. In Tom's case, the circumstantial evidence is just his location and race color.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird

tkam chapter 23

Instead, he takes on this sort of persona in order to give the white people in his community an explanation as to why he prefers a black woman and the black community in general. He paints his own picture of what happens, telling how lonely, outcast Mayella Ewell reached out for human contact to Tom Robinson and how things when wrong when Bob Ewell beat her up. Scout goes from a girl who wonders about the world and acts without thinking to a person who has experienced unfairness and thinks of a way to take action. If he is found guilty on appeal, Tom will be sentenced to death. Deas to avoid passing the Ewells because of Harassment. His strange habit of making himself appear to be a drunk once again points to the narrow-mindedness of the community.

Next

Notes on Chapter 23 from To Kill a Mockingbird

tkam chapter 23

Dolphus Raymond is a white man who lives on the riverbank with his wife who is black. Atticus tells Jem and Scout that because he made Ewell look like a fool, Ewell needed to get revenge. Chapter 22 Jem cries as the family leaves the court room. Meanwhile, Tom Robinson is in prison. Neither plan succeeds in convincing Atticus he is in danger. The chapter ends with the Jem, Scout, and Dill, as well as the black community, standing for Atticus out of respect for his efforts.


Next

To Kill A Mockingbird: Chapter 23 Summary

tkam chapter 23

From this observation, he segues into expressing his belief that anytime a white man cheats a black man, no matter the white man's money or history, 'that white man is trash. Aunt Alexandra still thinks they should be wary. In fact, one man on the jury wanted to acquit—amazingly, it was one of the Cunninghams. Alexandra asks Miss Maudie how the town can allow Atticus to wreck himself in pursuit of justice. He has a new understanding of the unfairness in the world and shows this by telling Atticus his ideas about how a court can be made better. Scout grows furious, and Jem hastily takes her out of the room.

Next

Notes on Chapter 23 from To Kill a Mockingbird

tkam chapter 23

Aunt Alexandra Upsets Scout Aunt Alexandra has silently listened to the entire conversation. Atticus thinks he has a good shot of winning on appeal. Tate the Sheriff asks Scout to retell the story and as she retells the story she says that she thinks that Jem fought off Mr. Scout comes up with the answer that there are just one type of folks and Jem shares his thoughts on why Boo Radley stays inside his house. Cunningham's son, also named Walter, who goes to school with her. When Tom Robinson reached for the box, Mayella hugged him around the waist and started kissing him.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 23 Summary

tkam chapter 23

Summary: Chapter 24 One day in August, Aunt Alexandra invites her missionary circle to tea. Aunt Alexandra tells Scout that they are not people that the Finch family should associate with because they are lower class poor. Walter Cunningham - one of a group of men who tried to harm Tom while Atticus guarded him in jail. Miss Stephanie Crawford, who had originally reported the news in the previous chapter, happily elaborates on the confrontation. That Walter's as smart as he can be, he just gets held back sometimes because he has to stay out and help his daddy.

Next